Rob Schlegel’s In the Tree Where the Double Sex Sleeps is dominated by three of the most remarkable long poems I’ve read in years, but it is especially "Novella" that has grabbed me and won’t let me go. Schlegel writes with the easy lyric mastery he has demonstrated in each of his previous books. In the Tree Where the Double Sex Sleeps quietly elicits a great clamor of feeling. - Shane McCrae, author and National Book Award finalist, In the Language of My Captor

Precise and nuanced, this lyric journey is at once fable, field guide, confession, and thrilling meditative adventure. I know of no poet quite so gifted as Rob Schlegel at chronicling the way "impulse turns over [the] mind." - Mary Szybist, author and National Book Award winner, Incarnadine

Rob Schlegel has a voice you’d follow into the dark woods, knowing full well it’s hard, awful, daily, plain, living truth you’re running toward. The speaker in this book is a heartbreaker of a storyteller—a synesthesiac of mixed feelings, bad news, and wordsmithery. I feel known, caught out, believed in, vulnerable, when I read this book. - Brenda Shaughnessy, judge, Iowa Poetry Prize

This slim volume covers remarkable emotional terrain...It is rich and complex but utterly accessible, with lyrical lines that beg to be read aloud.
-Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)

WHO

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ROB SCHLEGEL is the author of The Lesser Fields (Center for Literary Publishing 2009), selected by James Longenbach for the Colorado Prize for Poetry, and January Machine (Four Way Books 2014), selected by Stephanie Burt for the Grub Street National Book Prize. His third collection is In the Tree Where the Double Sex Sleeps (University of Iowa Press 2019), selected by Brenda Shaughnessy for the Iowa Poetry Prize. With the poets Daniel Poppick and Rawaan Alkhatib, he co-edits The Catenary Press. Most recently, he has taught at Whitman College, and in the MFA Program at Portland State University.

BOOKS

CONTACT

 

Publicity: heather[at]mindthebirdmedia[dot]com

Rob: schlegrg[at]whitman[dot]edu

 
 

author photo: Augusta Sparks Farnum